Spindrift Spotlight: Blackberry

Blackberry winter, the time when the hoarfrost lies on the blackberry blossoms; without this frost, the berries will not set. It is the forerunner of a rich harvest. –Margaret Mead

Did you know the blackberry isn’t technically a berry? We didn’t, either! The edible fruit, genus Rubus in the Rosaceae family, is technically called an aggregate fruit composed of small druplets. It is these dense, juicy druplets that our farmers harvest at just the right moment so we can make two of our most popular beverages: sweet and light Spindrift Blackberry Soda, and our new crisp and refreshing Spindrift Blackberry Seltzer. In fact, our feet are still purple from all that stomping!

All kidding aside, blackberries are grown around the world, and have multiple meanings and symbolism across cultures (for instance, did you know that early Christian folklore claimed Christ’s Crown of Thorns was made of blackberry runners? We didn’t, either!). Blackberries are also classified as a “superfood,” and have a number of positive health benefits. They are also rich in vitamins C and K.

Not only do blackberries seem to possess super-worldly powers of healing and nutrition, they are high in dietary fiber and only 62 calories per cup! Now, if that doesn’t give you permission to go blackberry-crazy, what will?

Here at Spindrift, we have caught the Blackberry bug, and wanted to find a way to put blackberries–the real deal, no boiled concentrates or powdered substitutes–right into our beverages. From bramble to bottle, from druplet to seltzer, we bring the real berries straight from the Pacific Northwest, where they are overflowing (one Northwest food writer calls them “deliciously invasive”), and crush them, creating both blackberry puree and straight juice to put directly into our two signature blackberry drinks:

Spindrift Blackberry Seltzer

Made with whole crushed blackberries and sparkling water.

Spindrift Backberry Soda

A delightfully light and refreshing blend of nothing but triple-filtered sparkling water, cane sugar and tons of real, ripe blackberries.

For the Pacific Northwest, August is the time for blackberries, so if your summer includes a visit, don’t forget to stop by the side of the road or walk in the woods to discover the different species of blackberries the Northwest has to offer.

And if you can’t make it up North for blackberry season? Then let Spindrift take you on a short trip to blackberry summer every time you open a bottle or a can.